Apidog

All-in-one Collaborative API Development Platform

API Design

API Documentation

API Designing

API Mock

API Automated Testing

Sign up for free

HTTP DELETE Request with Body

Start for free
Contents
Home / Basic Knowledge / HTTP DELETE Request with Body

HTTP DELETE Request with Body

The HTTP specification explicitly states that the DELETE method does not expect a request body. While other HTTP methods like POST and PUT often include a request body to send data to the server, the DELETE method is intended solely for resource deletion.

HTTP, or Hypertext Transfer Protocol, is the foundation of data communication on the World Wide Web. One of the HTTP methods is DELETE, designed to request the removal of a resource identified by a given URI. However, a recurring question arises in discussions about HTTP DELETE requests. Let's move on!

Does a DELETE HTTP request have a body?

The HTTP specification explicitly states that the DELETE method does not expect a request body. While other HTTP methods like POST and PUT often include a request body to send data to the server, the DELETE method is intended solely for resource deletion.

Can I send a body with a DELETE request?

Theoretically, HTTP allows sending a body with any request, including DELETE. However, it's essential to recognize that not all servers may support or handle a DELETE request with a body. Some servers may ignore the body entirely, while others might reject the request.

In practice, sending an HTTP DELETE request with a body is not a common or standardized approach. Most APIs and web servers adhere to the traditional use of DELETE without a request body. Introducing a body to a DELETE request might lead to inconsistent behavior across different servers and is likely to cause compatibility issues.

Therefore, while the specification doesn't prohibit sending a body with DELETE, it's not a recommended or widely supported practice.

Is an entity body allowed for an HTTP DELETE request?

In the HTTP specification, the DELETE method is defined as having no defined semantics for the request body. According to the HTTP/1.1 RFC 7231, "A payload within a DELETE request message has no defined semantics; sending a payload body on a DELETE request might cause some existing implementations to reject the request.

Sending DELETE Request with Body

If, for some specific use case, sending a body with a DELETE request is necessary, it's crucial to ensure that the server handling the request can interpret and process the body appropriately. Developers should be aware that this approach might not be universally supported and could result in unexpected behavior.

Apidog in HTTP DELETE Request

Apidog, our user-friendly API tool, transforms the process of crafting and executing DELETE requests into a straightforward and efficient experience. With its intuitive interface and rich features, Apidog becomes the ideal choice for developers, providing ease and simplicity in managing resource deletion within API workflows.

Apidog in HTTP DELETE Request

HTTP DELETE Body Example

While the HTTP specification doesn't define the semantics of a DELETE request body, some frameworks or applications might provide extensions that allow for such usage. However, developers should exercise caution and thoroughly test the compatibility of such implementations across different server environments.

Here is a hypothetical example of an HTTP DELETE request with a body:

DELETE /api/resource/123 HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/json
{
  "reason": "Obsolete data",
  "user": "john.doe"
}

In this example:

  • The URI /api/resource/123 represents the resource to be deleted.
  • The Content-Type header indicates that the body is in JSON format.
  • The JSON payload provides additional information, such as the reason for deletion and the user initiating the request.

Conclusion

In conclusion, while the HTTP specification technically permits including a body in a DELETE request, it goes against the conventional use of this method. Developers should prioritize adherence to established standards and be mindful of potential compatibility issues when considering unconventional practices.